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Primeur weekly 2019-08-12

Focus

The quest for European HPC research and innovation funding ...

Quantum computing

Unique electrical properties in quantum materials can be controlled using light ...

Light for the nanoworld ...

Middleware

Ohio Supercomputer Center to host seventh meeting of the MVAPICH Users Group ...

Hardware

Cray reports second quarter 2019 financial results ...

Mellanox Ethernet and InfiniBand solutions deliver breakthrough performance for AMD EPYC 7002 processor-based data centres ...

Phison at the forefront of PCIe Gen4 storage market with a portfolio of products ...

Researchers embrace imperfection to improve biomolecule transport ...

2nd Gen AMD EPYC processors set new standard for the modern data centre with record-breaking performance and significant TCO savings ...

HPE ProLiant shatters 37 world records ...

Cray awarded contracts with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the Army Engineering and Research Development Center ...

Cray Shasta supercomputer to power weather forecasting for the U.S. Air Force ...

GRC partners with Prasa to bring liquid immersion cooling to data centres in India ...

Excelero debuts Excelero NVEdge, software for creating NVMe All Flash Arrays (NAFA) from high-availability (HA) servers ...

Excelero honoured with Flash Memory Summit 2019 Best of Show Award for third year in a row ...

Simulation technique can predict microstructures of alloy materials used in jet engines - before they are made ...

Supermicro now offering AMD EPYC 7002 series processor-based systems to customers who want to transform their data centres ...

Boston now offers AMD EPYC 7002 series processor-based systems to customers ...

Lenovo and Intel announce multiyear global collaboration to extend HPC and AI leadership ...

Xilinx expands Alveo portfolio with industry's first adaptable compute, network and storage accelerator card built for any server and any Cloud ...

Penguin Computing expands Altus product family with AMD EPYC 7002 series processor-based systems, reaching new levels of data centre performance ...

Applications

Stanford researcher develops data standards for brain imaging and applies rigorous computational methods to work ...

HPE advances its intelligent data platform with acquisition of MapR business assets ...

Turbulence meets a shock ...

The Cloud

UC San Diego, UC Berkeley, and University of Washington announce 'CloudBank' Award ...

Light for the nanoworld


Defects in thin molybdenum sulfide layers, generated by bombardment with helium ions, can serve as nano-light sources for quantum technologies. Image: Christoph Hohmann / MCQST.
1 Aug 2019 Munich - An international team headed up by Alexander Holleitner and Jonathan Finley, physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), has succeeded in placing light sources in atomically thin material layers with an accuracy of just a few nanometers. The new method allows for a multitude of applications in quantum technologies, from quantum sensors and transistors in smartphones through to new encryption technologies for data transmission.

Previous circuits on chips rely on electrons as the information carriers. In the future, photons which transmit information at the speed of light will be able to take on this task in optical circuits. Quantum light sources, which are then connected with quantum fiber optic cables and detectors are needed as basic building blocks for such new chips.

An international team headed up by TUM physicists Alexander Holleitner and Jonathan Finley has now succeeded in creating such quantum light sources in atomically thin material layers and placing them with nanometer accuracy.

"This constitutes a first key step towards optical quantum computers", stated Julian Klein, lead author of the study. "Because for future applications the light sources must be coupled with photon circuits, waveguides for example, in order to make light-based quantum calculations possible."

The critical point here is the exact and precisely controllable placement of the light sources. It is possible to create quantum light sources in conventional three-dimensional materials such as diamond or silicon, but they cannot be precisely placed in these materials.

The physicists then used a layer of the semiconductor molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) as the starting material, just three atoms thick. They irradiated this with a helium ion beam which they focused on a surface area of less than one nanometer.

In order to generate optically active defects, the desired quantum light sources, molybdenum or sulfur atoms are precisely hammered out of the layer. The imperfections are traps for so-called excitons, electron-hole pairs, which then emit the desired photons.

Technically, the new helium ion microscope at the Walter Schottky Institute's Center for Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials, which can be used to irradiate such material with an unparalleled lateral resolution, was of central importance for this.

Together with theorists at TUM, the Max Planck Society, and the University of Bremen, the team developed a model which also describes the energy states observed at the imperfections in theory.

In the future, the researchers also want to create more complex light source patterns, in lateral two-dimensional lattice structures for example, in order to thus also research multi-exciton phenomena or exotic material properties.

This is the experimental gateway to a world which has long only been described in theory within the context of the so-called Bose-Hubbard model which seeks to account for complex processes in solids.

And there may be progress not only in theory, but also with regard to possible technological developments. Since the light sources always have the same underlying defect in the material, they are theoretically indistinguishable. This allows for applications which are based on the quantum-mechanical principle of entanglement.

"It is possible to integrate our quantum light sources very elegantly into photon circuits", stated Julian Klein. "Owing to the high sensitivity, for example, it is possible to build quantum sensors for smartphones and develop extremely secure encryption technologies for data transmission."

The work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation), by the TUM International Graduate School of Science and Engineering (IGSSE), by the clusters of excellence "Nanosystems Initiative Munich" (NIM), "Munich Center for Quantum Science and Technology" (MCQST) and "e-conversion", the TUM Institute for Advanced Study, the ExQM doctoral programme of the Bavarian Elite Network, by the European Union in the context of Horizon 2020, the Photonics Research Germany funding program, and the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities.

Alongside scientists from the Technical University of Munich, researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics in Garching, the University of Bremen, The State University of New York at Buffalo, USA and the National Institute for Materials Science in Tsukuba, Japan were also involved.

The paper titled " Site-selectively generated photon emitters in monolayer MoS2 via local helium ion irradiation " is authored by J. Klein, M. Lorke, M. Florian, F. Sigger, L. Sigl, S. Rey, J. Wierzbowski, J. Cerne, K. Müller, E. Mitterreiter, P. Zimmermann, T. Taniguchi, K. Watanabe , U. Wurstbauer, M. Kaniber, M. Knap, R. Schmidt, J.J. Finley, and A.W. Holleitner. It is published inNature Communications, 10, 2755 (2019) - DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-10632-z.
Source: Technical University of Munich - TUM

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2019-08-12

Focus

The quest for European HPC research and innovation funding ...

Quantum computing

Unique electrical properties in quantum materials can be controlled using light ...

Light for the nanoworld ...

Middleware

Ohio Supercomputer Center to host seventh meeting of the MVAPICH Users Group ...

Hardware

Cray reports second quarter 2019 financial results ...

Mellanox Ethernet and InfiniBand solutions deliver breakthrough performance for AMD EPYC 7002 processor-based data centres ...

Phison at the forefront of PCIe Gen4 storage market with a portfolio of products ...

Researchers embrace imperfection to improve biomolecule transport ...

2nd Gen AMD EPYC processors set new standard for the modern data centre with record-breaking performance and significant TCO savings ...

HPE ProLiant shatters 37 world records ...

Cray awarded contracts with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the Army Engineering and Research Development Center ...

Cray Shasta supercomputer to power weather forecasting for the U.S. Air Force ...

GRC partners with Prasa to bring liquid immersion cooling to data centres in India ...

Excelero debuts Excelero NVEdge, software for creating NVMe All Flash Arrays (NAFA) from high-availability (HA) servers ...

Excelero honoured with Flash Memory Summit 2019 Best of Show Award for third year in a row ...

Simulation technique can predict microstructures of alloy materials used in jet engines - before they are made ...

Supermicro now offering AMD EPYC 7002 series processor-based systems to customers who want to transform their data centres ...

Boston now offers AMD EPYC 7002 series processor-based systems to customers ...

Lenovo and Intel announce multiyear global collaboration to extend HPC and AI leadership ...

Xilinx expands Alveo portfolio with industry's first adaptable compute, network and storage accelerator card built for any server and any Cloud ...

Penguin Computing expands Altus product family with AMD EPYC 7002 series processor-based systems, reaching new levels of data centre performance ...

Applications

Stanford researcher develops data standards for brain imaging and applies rigorous computational methods to work ...

HPE advances its intelligent data platform with acquisition of MapR business assets ...

Turbulence meets a shock ...

The Cloud

UC San Diego, UC Berkeley, and University of Washington announce 'CloudBank' Award ...